Our History

Food for Others was founded in 1995 with a mission to distribute food to our neighbors in need by mobilizing our giving community and volunteers. We began as a continuation of Lazarus at the Gate, an earlier emergency food services program founded by Dr. George McManmon to prevent individuals in Northern Virginia from going to bed hungry.

When Lazarus at the Gate ceased operations in June of 1995, the Department of Community Action, Fairfax County, and previous Lazarus volunteers worked together to establish Food for Others, a new 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that would provide food to local families in need. Food for Others was incorporated on October 20, 1995 and operations officially commenced six weeks later.

At our start in 1995, we had a small paid staff of four and were operated almost entirely by volunteers and our Board of Directors, chaired by Ed Demoney. Food for Others began feeding local families in need through three major programs:

(1) distributing food directly from our Merrifield warehouse,

(2) serving as a food bank for our community partners, and

(3) providing food at our neighborhood sites throughout Fairfax County.

In 2011, Food for Others added our fourth food distribution program, the Power Pack Program (P3), which provides weekend backpack food to students at Fairfax County elementary schools during the school year.

In February of 2004, Roxanne Rice was hired as Food for Others’ first Executive Director. During her 12 years at Food for Others, she expanded FFO’s programs to better provide for all of the hungry families in our community. Roxanne is succeeded by our current executive director, Annie Turner, a longtime FFO volunteer and board member, who took the helm in July of 2016.

Food for Others added the “choice” section to our Warehouse in July of 2016, which allows our clients to shop in a small, grocery store-like setting instead of receiving a box of pre-selected food. Since the program’s creation, our clients have been able to select foods they like, including familiar, culturally-relevant items and fresh produce.

A central component of Food for Others’ mission has always been to reduce food waste. We obtain most of our food through food rescue operations. Staff and volunteers pick up good food that would be thrown away from local grocery stores and collect fresh produce from farms, community gardens, and farmers’ markets. The warehouse also receives food from individual donors, community food drives, the Capital Area Food Bank, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Over the past 24 years, Food for Others has established itself as an essential part of Northern Virginia’s safety net for those needing food when emergency strikes, and for the growing number of working poor who are unable to make ends meet and need to supplement their inadequate food supplies. In our first year of operation, we served about 105 families per month. 24 years later, Food for Others feeds more than 1,800 families each week.

Throughout the years, one thing that has stayed the same at FFO is our incredible community of donors and volunteers who work tirelessly to provide food for their neighbors in need. We could not operate without their support.